An Amazing Life Lived By Alastair Borthwick

Alastair Borthwick was a Scottish writer who loved everything about his country. His work included him showing off the highlands of Scotland to showing the harsh realities about wartime. No matter what he decided to cover, it was always quality work. This is why when Borthwick passed away at age 90, many people felt like the lost a true piece of history.

Borthwick’s story started off in Rutherglen, Lanarkshire. He then moved at age 11 to Glasgow and then moved again at 16 to be a copy taker at the Evening Times. He then moved to the Glasgow Weekly Herald and then became an editor of 5 different pages of the news. This was an impressive feat because he was still a teenager at the time. In the 1930’s Alastair Borthwick discovered the wonderful world of rock climbing. His writings on the subject were published in the Faber and Faber newspaper, and became a series called ‘ Always A Little Further.’ The series was a success with all the readers for the different types of emotions that it captivated. 

After his time with the Glasgow Weekly Herald, Borthwick moved to London. This is where he went into radio broadcasting with the BBC. While here he discovered his talent for spoken word and produced scripts that had the listeners intrigued. 

In 1940, Borthwick married his wife, Annie and shortly went into the service afterwards. While in the military, he was able to capture the experiences and life stories of those around him, which even included the harsh realities about war. After the war, Borthwick and his wife moved to the coast of Jura and moved to a small cottage. They remained there for 7 years, and had a son named Patrick. During that time the BBC gave him a 3 year contract to survey people about post war Scotland and the effects that it had on the country. He won many awards for this show and for other work that followed. 

Alastair Borthwick and his family made a final move in 1960 to South Ayrshire and lived the rest of his life there. He continued to do some editorial work for newspapers, and even had a 13 part series about the realities of Scottish soldiers. He will be truly missed, but his wonderful works will still live on.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/alastair-borthwick-gf0fkwlb07r

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